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La decorazione miniata del Martirologio ambrosiano trecentesco (Berlino-Milano, Kupf. Hs. 78 C 16 e Ambr. ms. P 165 sup.)

digital La decorazione miniata del Martirologio ambrosiano trecentesco
(Berlino-Milano, Kupf. Hs. 78 C 16 e Ambr. ms. P 165 sup.)
Articolo
rivista ARTE LOMBARDA
fascicolo ARTE LOMBARDA - 2015 - 3
titolo La decorazione miniata del Martirologio ambrosiano trecentesco (Berlino-Milano, Kupf. Hs. 78 C 16 e Ambr. ms. P 165 sup.)
autore
editore Vita e Pensiero
formato Articolo | Pdf
online da 05-2016
issn 0004-3443 (stampa)
€ 6,00

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The ambrosian Psalter, Hymnarium and Martyrologium (Berlin, Kupferstichkabinett - Staatliche Museen, Hs. 78 C 16 and Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, ms. P 165 sup., ff. 1r-21v) is a 13th century Milan code abundantly illuminated: it enclose 15 miniatures in the Psalter and in the Hymnarium, along with 123 pages entirely historiated in the Martyrologium. In this latter the pictures of the saints’ life and martyrdom – which go always with the hagiographical narrations – possess a pervading narrative power: they often spread over more than one episode, going even along the lateral margin and the bas de page. Moreover the link between the text and the illuminated images is quite close, and their iconography is faithful to the narration in most cases. Given the strong stylistic resemblances between this code and the Paris Pantheon’s one (Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat. 4895; dated to 1331), it is possible to ascribe the miniatures to the Pantheon Master. Moreover, given their fewer monumental afflatus and qualitative endurance, they has been likely crafted by the Master’s workshop. Thanks to shape of certain garments, the miniatures can be dated between 1331 – the year recorded in the Pantheon code – and the end of the fourth decade of the 14th century, maybe not far from 1331. Since the manuscript lacks elements ascribable to religious orders, it has been likely crafted for an important Milan secular Church; maybe to the Cathedral itself, judging from the iconographic abundance.

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