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Proposte negli anni venti per un’architettura fascista: il primo Centro Federale di Milano; la sede di un Gruppo Rionale; una Casa per Balilla

digital Proposte negli anni venti per un’architettura fascista:
il primo Centro Federale di Milano; la sede di un Gruppo Rionale;
una Casa per Balilla
Articolo
rivista ARTE LOMBARDA
fascicolo ARTE LOMBARDA - 2015 - 3
titolo Proposte negli anni venti per un’architettura fascista: il primo Centro Federale di Milano; la sede di un Gruppo Rionale; una Casa per Balilla
autore
editore Vita e Pensiero
formato Articolo | Pdf
online da 05-2016
issn 0004-3443 (stampa)
€ 6,00

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As soon as the Fascists came to power they promoted a reorganisation of the state, which included some significant building works. Important among these were the headquarters for Gruppi Rionali (Fascist neighbourhood groups) in built-up areas, with meeting places and offices for organising the political life and welfare of the population. These centres initially had makeshift quarters but it was soon necessary to have special buildings to replace the Socialist ‘Case del Popolo’, the headquarters of the Catholic associations and, during the war, the ‘Case del Soldato’, which had sprung up in their hundreds since the turn of the century. For some of its first new buildings, the Party called in Paolo Mezzanotte, an expert who had already made a name for himself in the first decade of the century and who found himself having to deal with constantly evolving situations in Milan, meeting rapidly increasing needs and changes.
The classicist architecture of these initial buildings took inspiration from Pompeii and from Cinquecento and neoclassical Italian models. His first Fascist buildings reflected this, as is clear to see in the Casa Rionale Baracca in Milan, the Fascist Federal Headquarters for the city and province, and the Casa del Balilla in Gallarate. The experiment ended with the Milan Stock Exchange, a building for a different purpose but equally symbolic of the new order in public life, also designed by Paolo Mezzanotte. It was soon overtaken by Novecento, rationalist and Piacentini-style architecture, which the regime made its own and spread throughout the country in the following decade.

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